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Eating Disorders Among Female Athletes are High

Female athletes thrive in a world where coming out victorious is vital. They go through rigorous training, proper discipline, and strict diet. Some, however, push themselves to their limits by excessively working out and controlling their diet. As such, the world of athletics shows alarming rates of eating disorders among female athletes.

Treatment for bulimia or anorexia in our Westport practice handles eating disorders with utmost care. We use a combination fo techniques that allows us to help patients maintain recovery. But first, we dig deep to understand the underlying factors that drive the disorder. With female athletes, the reason may be the environment.

Why Is It Common Among Female Athletes?

The sports culture encourages women athletes to stay in excellent body size or shape for flawless performance. It’s this culture that often triggers them in developing eating disorders, like bulimia nervosa (BN) or anorexia nervosa (AN).

The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) reports that almost 33 percent of Division 1 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) female athletes showed symptoms that place them at risk for AN. Additionally, 2.85 percent of female athletes have “a clinically significant problem with anorexia nervosa.”

The symptoms include the following:

  • Excessive fasting
  • Preoccupation with food
  • Binging
  • Purging
  • Fear of being overweight
  • Compulsive exercising
  • Obsession with training even when injured

Sports that emphasize the need to be thin can affect an athlete’s overall state of health. These sports include figure skating, gymnastics, and running. Eating disorders affect almost 62 percent of female athletes involved in figure skating and gymnastics.

The stress involved in athletic performance adds to the usual risk factors, like family history, making sports a breeding ground for mental illnesses. If you know someone dealing with eating disorders, it’s important to lead them toward a track of recovery through treatment.

Which Therapies are Applicable for Them?

Group therapy is a helpful treatment for female athletes. This kind of therapy can help relieve them from feelings of isolation, shame, or stigma. The sense of belonging helps them get through their condition, knowing that other people go through the same thing.

Family counseling can help, as well. A family can ensure the understanding and removal of potential negative influences in a person’s daily environment. When you have an athlete in the family or your circle of friends, give her the love and support she needs.

Coaches and families play a vital role in a female athlete’s life. As the people closest to the girl, analyzing and acknowledging the symptoms at an early stage can help – before things get worse.

Our treatment programs in Westport can provide the most appropriate treatment.

A Safe, Supportive, and Comfortable Environment

The Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Health helps people with eating disorders, like bulimia, binge eating, and other conditions. We design comprehensive treatment plans to help patients cope with their urges, even after leaving the treatment center.

Our compassionate team of psychiatrists apply many psychotherapies, self-care methods, and recovery techniques. We practice a holistic approach to treatmeting, combining DBT with mindfulness psychotherapies. We also use relaxation techniques that help patients understand their emotions without the judgment.

Take control of your life or help a loved one do so. Contact us today to live free from eating disorders.

a woman by the field

The Mental & Biological Causes of Bulimia and Eating Disorders

A person diagnosed with bulimia (or bulimia nervosa) faces potentially life-threatening mental and physical risks, if not treated appropriately. According to the National Eating Disorders Association, only 1 percent of women and 0.1 percent of men in the United States have bulimia, but researchers dispute this as the real figure; like other mental health disorders, many choose to keep their condition a secret.

Bulimia stems from both mental and biological factors. If you or a loved one shows signs of bulimia, seek immediate medical attention to help treat the condition and prevent further damage to you or your loved one’s body and mind. Some of the symptoms listed in the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-5 include:

  • Evidence of recurring episodes of binge eating (e.g., large amounts of food disappearing)
  • Evidence of purging and inappropriate behavior to prevent weight gain (e.g., induced vomiting, laxatives, fasting, excessive exercise)
  • Uncomfortable eating around others, fear of eating in public
  • Stained teeth
  • Drastic weight changes
  • Self-injury, substance abuse, and other signs seen in mental health conditions

Different studies have found many causes related to bulimia, which stretches to both one’s physical and psychological health.

Emotional Stress & Mental Health

There is no specific mental cause for bulimia; one of the usual reasons is it is a coping method for emotional stress. Although it starts as a coping method, it quickly develops into an uncontrollable habit. Often, bulimia appears in a person along with other mental conditions such as depression, anxiety, stress, obsessive-compulsive disorders, and others.

Body Image and External Factors

Many people find an irrational fear of weight gain and, as such, perform dangerous methods to avoid food intake and weight gain. Research has shown that environmental factors such as the media and fashion industry’s portrayal of beauty as well as sports or other sectors that emphasize weight loss affects one’s body image. However, while bulimia is linked to the fear of becoming overweight, researchers found it is more related to emotional and mental health.

Contrary to popular belief, it is not always about one’s body image. Bulimia also stems from external problems. Problems such as within one’s family trigger some patients to develop bulimia, which is why studies have found involving parents in adolescent bulimia treatment are far more effective than treatment where the patient alone undergoes therapy.

Genetic Inheritance

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, bulimia and other mental disorders seem to have a hereditary factor, as it occurs within families in between generations. Studies have not sufficiently proven if this is the work of people’s genetics or because of their shared environment, and it is a study worth investigating in the future.

Regardless of the cause, patients who have bulimia are at risk of several mental and physical disorders, which, if left untreated, can be fatal. Diagnosis is difficult because some people choose to hide their condition and symptoms. However, if they spot such symptoms, they should seek immediate care for their physical and mental state. The Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Health offers bulimia treatment in Westport that addresses the symptoms of the eating disorders, as well as their possible triggers.

Click here to learn more about eating disorders and their treatment today.

Startup Business People Working on Laptop

How to Deal with Eating Disorder in Your Workplace

Eating disorders can affect anyone, even adults in the workforce. But you might find it difficult to identify whether one of your employees suffers from such problems.

If left undiagnosed or untreated, eating problems can cause serious health complications and can affect someone’s job performance. Fortunately, treatments like Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) help individuals overcome bulimia and other eating disorders. DBT teaches individuals new skills to manage negative emotions and reduce conflicts in relationships.

Now, the question is: how can you address eating disorders in your office?

Understand Their Condition

A good starting point would be to educate yourself. Eating disorders are serious problems associated with eating behaviors that have adversely affect someone’s health, emotions, and ability to function in daily life activities.

Eating problems usually occur when a person worries too much about body shape and weight because of social pressures. In America, a significant number of people face the challenges of these disorders.

The most common types of eating problems are bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, and anorexia nervosa. Bulimia refers to consuming a huge amount of food followed by purging through forced vomiting.

Unlike people with bulimia, those who have anorexia tend to ignore food or only consume small servings of certain meals. They perceive themselves as overweight even if they are alarmingly underweight.

Watch Out for the Signs

Although it’s not easy to identify someone with eating disorders, there are signs to pay attention to allowing you to help an employee or coworker.

Individuals who have problematic eating habits are commonly obsessed with food, appearance, weight, and dieting. They admire thin people and feel envious of their thinness. This attitude may result in excessive weight loss.

Additionally, these people also try to avoid corporate events that involve food. You can observe that they withdraw from their co-workers and routine tasks.

In some cases, you may also notice evidence of binge eating. Others, on the other hand, head to the bathroom after eating to purge. They might also have scarred knuckles because of forced vomiting.

Talk About the Problem

If you have employees showing warning signs of an eating disorder and their performance starts to decline, try to have a discussion about it in a private meeting. Remember though not to make assumptions solely based on their appearance and to respect the individual’s right to confidentiality. You may also wish to bring in the human resources department to the conversation.

It’s essential to promote awareness and educate everyone in your workplace about eating disorders. A concerned and inclusive workplace allows for efficiency and productivity.

These illnesses can be life-threatening. So it’s crucial to pay attention to unusual behaviors that your employees show toward eating. Our Westport, Connecticut center offers comprehensive treatment plans designed to help individuals live free from eating disorders. We combine DBT with mindfulness-based psychotherapies and relaxation techniques.

We practice a variety of techniques that can help patients to heal in a safe and comfortable environment and achieve long-term recovery.

Contact us today to know more about our strategies.

Dirty Jobs: How to Manage Your Anxiety in a Toxic Work Environment

In some toxic workplaces, running the rat race is the only way to get ahead. However, this can come at the price of your own mental health.

Many working adults have undiagnosed anxiety disorders. Because they are undiagnosed, said adults can sometimes develop an unhealthy behavior of avoiding situations that may trigger anxiety, making it difficult to perform tasks and inadvertently increasing stress.

Psychiatrists in Westport, CT, suggest identifying when a workplace is becoming toxic and taking necessary steps aside from therapy to actively reduce the amount of anxiety and stress that one might feel in the workplace.

Set Your Limits

Draw a line in the sand that you won’t cross when it comes to what work you will take on, tell your boss firmly but gently when a job isn’t ok, and always leave work on time. A toxic boss might frown at this; however, it benefits you in the long run and helps you develop other positive skills such as time management.

Setting physical and emotional limitations for you in the workplace is an effective way of staving off stress and retaining a sense of self-worth and self-esteem. These limitations help you engage positively in a situation that would otherwise trigger anxiety and help you create a coping mechanism that allows you to tackle work at a reasonable pace.

De-Stress When You Can

It might seem minor, but taking a short break every hour or so can significantly decrease stress levels in a person. Often, people forget to take a step back from their work in order to approach it from a different angle. Short breaks can consist of getting up and taking a walk around the office, getting a piece of fruit from the pantry, or it can even be as simple as looking out the window. Whatever the activity, the important part is to disengage from your work briefly to give your mind time to relax and recharge.

Excessive stress can make people perform less effectively, leading to poor results. By taking short pauses throughout the work day, you will feel refreshed every time you return to your task.

Manage Your Reactions

One of the most important things to realize is that, while you cannot control how others act, you can control how you react. Adjusting your cognitive process can significantly help how you manage your feelings and thoughts about certain situations.

By recognizing the limitations of what we can control, we are able to strengthen what we can control by reinforcing beneficial habits through positive thinking and changing the way we perceive the situation you are in.

At the Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Health, we offer various therapies in the treatment of anxiety in adults. Our certified psychiatrists and therapists treat anxiety in adults and help them function better in everyday life. By treating anxiety, the Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Health hopes to reduce the symptoms of other disorders like depression. Contact us today to learn more about what we can do for you.

Daughter giving a comforting hug

Keeping It Together: How Post-Divorce Therapy Helps Families Heal

Divorce is an unfortunate reality for a lot of families in the country. Although some divorces may stem from abusive behaviors or infidelity, many are the result of irreconcilable differences, unresolved issues, or a relationship grown distant.

While the act of divorcing is primarily a choice made by the married couple, its repercussions extend beyond the couple – which is why family counseling is so important. In Westport, Connecticut, post-divorce therapy is available for couples and families going through the divorce process.

Life after divorce can be tough, tiring, and draining. However, with the right type of therapy, couples and families can find the strength to move on. Here are some benefits of post-divorce therapy.

Support

Divorce is an emotionally taxing time for everyone involved, from the couple in question to their children, and even their extended family. Post-divorce therapy can help people cope with the emotional and mental stress that comes with the divorce process.

Post-divorce therapy gives people the support to understand who they are as individuals outside of a marriage, or as individuals who are no longer part of a “nuclear” family unit. More importantly, therapy will also help people identify and understand problematic behaviors within themselves in order to correct these. This allows the family to cope with feelings of anger and anxiety in a healthy way.

Structure

Not only does divorce take up a substantial amount of emotional energy, it can also take over a family’s life. Negativity, frequent fighting, and abusive behavior can easily become the norm if positive structures are not put in place.

One of the things that can get a family through the process of a divorce is creating structure.  Providing or reinforcing structure can take the form of creating positive habits, implementing effective time management, and even something as simple as finding the time to talk to your children on a regular basis. Post-divorce therapy allows families and individuals to heal in a contextualized and structured way, minimizing the risk of negative behaviors from spiraling out of control.

Resources

Perhaps the most important part of post-divorce therapy is how it provides people with actionable resources to help them through the process. Therapy not only provides people structure and support during a session, it also helps people support themselves outside of the therapist’s clinic.

In post-divorce therapy, people will learn exercises that will maximize their mindfulness of others, inspire them to validate each other more often, and help regulate their emotions more effectively. The goal of post-divorce therapy is to let each member of the family know that they are heard, understood, and accepted. In this way, everyone involved can move forward in a positive manner.

At The Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Health, we believe that every individual deserves a chance at recovering from the emotional and mental stress of divorce, which is why our therapists take their time to get to know you so that they can create a comprehensive therapy plan that addresses your emotional needs. Contact us today to learn more about how we can help you heal your mind.

happy couple

Couples Therapy: An Element of Long-Standing Relationships

At first glance, couples therapy sounds intimidating. Deciding to see a therapist, after all, involves admitting that things are not perfect in a relationship. Experts consider couples therapy helpful at any stage of a relationship, however. Seeing a counselor can teach couples communication skills and how to listen to their partner with fresh ears, for instance.

Some couples wait until an issue gets out of hand before they come to therapy. While it is normal for couples to experience conflicts and disagreements, regular relationship counseling can help couples overcome obstacles and improve their understanding of each other.

Improving Conflict Resolution

Most of the big issues that couples face started out small but festered. Therapy helps by equipping couples with the tools and techniques to improve the way they resolve an argument. Moreover, therapy teaches the couple that there are three sides to a conflict: the sides of both parties and the truth. With this way of thinking, couples can work together to come to an agreement.

More than viewing therapy as a solution to a crisis, though, couples would do well to consider it as an integral aspect of a healthy relationship. Knowing how to keep arguments from spiraling maintains the peace in a relationship, after all.

A Safe Space to Discuss Issues

Infidelity may be the most common reason why couples resort to therapy, but it could also help address similarly relevant issues, such as miscommunication, money trouble, and an unsatisfactory sex life.

A lack of communication, in particular, is a big concern for couples. And engaging in more conversations doesn’t necessarily improve communication. Effective communication stems from feeling heard, cared for, and respected. A therapist helps by studying a couple’s old communication patterns, then replacing them with positive ones.

Sensitive issues like a couple’s sex life, along with major life changes like career changes can destabilize a couple’s relationship and make them feel stuck. Therapy provides a safe space to discuss sensitive and complex issues and understand how the relationship may be failing to meet their expectations.

Understanding Different Perspectives

Couples bring different perspectives into their relationships. While it’s easy for one member to think from their point of view, they may lose sight of the overarching issue wherein both sides might be right and have a valid point.

When one person talks about their significant other, it’s possible for them to experience trouble understanding their partner’s views. Sometimes, they stick to their version of events which could cause mix-ups in communication.

A third party can help couples understand each other’s emotions and thought processes. With help thinking outside of their perspective, a relationship could come out stronger.

Arguments and disagreements are not necessarily a sign of a broken marriage; in fact, it could open the doorway to deeper levels of intimacy and connection. The Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Health provides couples therapy to deepen your understanding of your partner and address issues of discontent in your relationship.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment.

Newly graduate students

Graduation Blues: Overcoming Post-College Depression

Life’s biggest transitional periods are accompanied by feelings of anxiety. This includes entering marriage, the infamous quarter-life crisis, empty nest syndrome, and retirement.

A less commonly discussed transitional phase is the change that follows after college. Students may feel nostalgic after having to leave behind the familiar academic environment — friendships with peer groups, being a part of a tight-knit community, participating in local interest groups, and attending parties.

It’s more than just heavy-hearted nostalgia for others, however. Sometimes, fresh graduates experience post-college depression, or the extreme sadness and impaired functioning during the transition from school to the workplace. A person’s inability to move from student life to adult life is an issue that requires serious attention.

Post-Graduate Depression Is Underreported

Therapists claim that post-college depression is understudied and underreported. Sheryl Ziegler, a licensed professional counselor, believes that young adults can be difficult to study and categorize from a research perspective. On a similar vein, some people shy away from talking about post-college gloom, because culture dictates that graduation is a “joyful time.”

Furthermore, studies about post-graduate depression are difficult to find. There is a multitude of studies analyzing the causes of depression among individuals between 18-25 years old, but data on the blues that students experience following graduation tends to dramatically dwindle.

The symptoms of post-uni depression include lethargy, pessimism, a general sense of hopelessness, and in some cases, substance abuse. Usually, those who experience the blues are unmotivated to find a job.

When Expectations Fail to Meet Reality

Statistics show that Millennials have the highest rates of depression and anxiety than any other generational group. Job hunting and workplace issues, in particular, fall high on their list of concerns.

A study from the University of Pittsburgh concludes that Millennials showing signs of depression are also prone to be more active on social media apps like Facebook and Instagram. The habit, however, only creates feelings of helplessness and the narrow view that everyone else has their life figured out.

Getting Out of the Post-Uni Slump

Suffering from depression while unemployed can make a person feel like they’re stuck in a slump. Seeking out professional help and talking to a psychiatrist in Westport is one way to deal with the situation positively and proactively. Experts also suggest overcoming feelings of depression through the following:

  • Being realistic – New graduates need to acknowledge the current market and where their skills fit in. It’s impossible to reach one’s professional goals straight out of college, after all.
  • Focusing on skills – People shouldn’t feel discouraged if their college successes fail to make an impact on the “real world.” It helps to focus on how past triumphs were achieved, and then think that current issues are just a new set of challenges to face and overcome.
  • Recognize improvements – Sometimes, life doesn’t go according to plan. Try to stay positive, though. Focus on areas of improvement to avoid making the same mistakes again.
  • Communicate with family and friends – Parents and peers can provide support to struggling individuals during major, life-changing transitions. It helps to be open about job hunting and the frustrations that come along with it.

If you’re experiencing post-college depression, you can count on The Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Health for help. We treat depressive disorders using evidence-based psychotherapy and techniques to improve your quality of life.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment.

Chronically Tired? Signs that Anxiety Might be Causing Your Fatigue

Do you remember the last time you actually watched a prime-time show without fighting the urge to fall asleep?

If you continuously lack energy because of an ongoing feeling of tiredness, you might be suffering from fatigue. Unlike the feeling of tiredness that comes with regular colds or some other viral infection, chronic fatigue is lingering, constant, and limiting. It can hinder your ability to be productive at work or to function at home. The constant feeling of exhaustion may render you unable to manage your daily affairs.

The usual culprits behind fatigue include anemia, allergic rhinitis, and fibromyalgia, among other medical reasons. Anxiety, however, can cause you to feel exceptionally tired all the time.

Sympathetic System Overdrive

The Web radio show host and clinical psychologist Dr. Joshua Klapow says anxiety drives the body’s sympathetic nervous system into overdrive.

Anxiety elevates blood pressure and increases the heart rate, it makes muscles tense, and it releases toxins into the system, causing inflammation. The way your body reacts to anxiety, therefore, is enough to make you feel fatigue and malaise.

Normal Tiredness vs. Anxiety

If you are otherwise healthy but still feel tired all the time, here are some signs to look out for to tell the difference between normal tiredness and fatigue induced by anxiety:

  1. You feel too tired all the time, even after a night’s sleep.

According to therapist Kimberly Hershenson, LMSW, if you are getting at least seven hours of sleep daily and still feel tired, it’s likely that something else is going on.

Gladys Frankel, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist, says feeling drained all the time may mean that your body is constantly on “high alert,” as anxiety causes an intense surge of cortisol rushing through the body. It’s like your body is always preparing for something dangerous to happen, and that can be exhausting.

In addition, the author of Misdiagnosed: The Adrenal Fatigue Link, Dr. Steven Zodkoy, says tiredness, anxiety, and a hectic lifestyle are definitely connected. The problem is today’s stressors may be low-grade, but they are continuous. Take the constant buzzing of phones and being on social media 24/7. These are low-grade yet constant, which means they never give the body’s fight or flight pathway a chance to turn off or rebuild.

  1. You feel tired before a social event

If you feel “sleepy” right before a major gathering, you might have social anxiety. People who don’t have social anxiety tend to feel energized by human interaction. Meanwhile, those who have social anxiety may feel physically or mentally drained before, during or after being around a large group.

  1. You experience a host of other malaise.

Anxiety goes hand-in-hand with many symptoms, so any weird issues your body might be experiencing could be a result of anxiety. Hershenson says that people struggling with anxiety are likely to encounter symptoms such as migraines, heart palpitations, shortness of breath, and even simple stomach pains, on top of chronic fatigue.

If you suspect that anxiety is causing your chronic fatigue, check with a reputable psychiatrist in Westport. The Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Health is home to experienced professionals providing comprehensive, tailored mental health services to individuals and families.

To learn more or to set an appointment, call toll-free at 1-888-745-3372 or fill out the form today.

a woman by the field

Learning How to Manage Your Emotions Leads to a Happier Life

Mental and behavioral disorders have links to a person’s emotional sphere. Even when they’re not the main cause of distress, it’s still inevitable that the conditions will affect how a person feels about themselves and other people.

This is why at The Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Health we focus on helping children, teens, and adults learn how to manage their emotions through dialectic behavior therapy or DBT. Our facility at Westport, Connecticut is equipped with adequate rooms and materials for DBT sessions. We hope that through these interventions, you can learn to be the master of your emotions.

A Focus of Dialectic Behavior Therapy

DBT is therapeutic in nature. Although its first purpose was to treat borderline personality disorder, psychiatrists soon realized its effectiveness for other types of mental and behavioral disorders, like depression, bipolar disorder, eating disorders, substance abuse, and PTSD.

In our DBT sessions, you will experience one-on-one therapy or group learning activities, depending on which program you choose. Regardless of the type, though, our entire DBT Program has one goal: to teach practical skills that will make you constantly mindful of your thoughts, behaviors, and emotions.

Strengthen your Mind and Be “Present”

Being a cognitive-behavioral treatment, the key areas that DBT develops in patients is mindfulness. It refers to a person’s awareness of his or her thoughts, emotions, urges, and actions. It is the set of answers to the questions, “What?” and “How?” Think of it as the “collection of data” stage.

Learning this skill enables you to take a step back and look at your circumstance with a clearer eye. Without awareness, it’s not possible to manage — even change — emotions.

Notice that the principle of mindfulness aligns with the rehabilitation process of people dealing with addictions. Before they can do something about their problem, they need to be aware and acknowledge that there is, indeed, an issue to address.

Avoiding Distress is Not the Answer

Psychiatrists and therapists will tell you that the best way to deal with emotions is to accept and tolerate, not avoid them. Tolerance in this respect, however, doesn’t mean letting emotions cloud your decisions. It’s more about accepting that you’re currently in a challenging situation and then choosing to do something about it.

This is distress tolerance, a common approach to mental health treatments. Through DBT, you will learn how to bear negative emotions skillfully.

Managing Emotions: How Do You Do This?

There is a generic answer to this question: when you experience a negative emotion, and you feel the urge to succumb to certain behaviors or addictions, stop and take the opposite action. This is the active and practical application of mindfulness, distress tolerance, and changing emotions. If you master it, you’ll be able to choose the path to happiness over depression, anxiety, anger, and so forth.

It’s not quick or easy to learn how to manage or change emotions. The unwavering support of family and friends, as well as the guidance of experienced therapists who care about you overcoming your disorders, will be of great help.

Allow us to help you succeed in this journey. The Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Health offers four modes of treatment to accommodate different levels of need. To learn more about these programs, contact us today.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Skills to Help You Enjoy the Holiday Season

The holiday season is a time of joy for many people. Some, however, dread and struggle through this time as the whole holiday experience can be exhausting. While it may not be possible for people to control the situation around them, they can practice individual Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) skills to navigate through the difficulties of the season and make the holidays enjoyable.

If you want to create a more stress-free and enjoyable season for yourself and others, keep these skills in mind.

Participate

This core mindfulness skill is about completely immersing yourself in what you’re doing at the moment. Practicing this skill allows you to gently let go of distractions so you can get back to who you are during the holiday season.

Always remember that you can participate either in misery or stress or in the various opportunities for joy that the season brings to people.

Build Positive Experience (BPE)

BPE begins with being mindful of positive events happening around you. People sometimes miss opportunities for connection or fun as they drown in their worries and problems. Take advantage of the positives that are possible this season. Some things you can do to build positive experiences are:

  • Watch time-honored films
  • Listen to your favorite holiday music
  • Schedule times for community functions, get-togethers, and other events

Attend to Relationships (A2R)

Relationships are similar to plants. When you do not water them, they wither and die. So, take the time to practice A2R. Send pictures or cards to your loved ones. Alternatively, connect with people by Skype, phone, or in person. The important thing is to let the important people in your life know that they matter to you.

If you believe you need or can benefit from DBT in Westport, CT, schedule a DBT session with The Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Health. We will work closely with you to create and implement a personalized treatment plan.

Contact us today.